Changes and opportunities

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The system security of Finland’s main grid has been first-class for a long time, and spring was no exception to this, despite all the twists and turns along the way.

It was quite a start to the year. I watched events unfold as I learned the ropes in my new position as the Senior Vice President in charge of main grid operations: wind power production surpassed the 3,000 megawatt threshold for the first time, Olkiluoto 3 was synchronised with the main grid for the first time, the value of purchased reserves set a new monthly record in May, and electricity transmissions from Russia stopped.

The system security of Finland’s main grid has been first-class for a long time, and spring was no exception to this, despite all the twists and turns along the way. During the summer, the extraordinary circumstances precipitated by Russia’s war of aggression led to unprecedented interest in the adequacy of electricity. Substantial uncertainties surround the adequacy of electricity in the coming winter, and the situation is highly susceptible to changes that could raise the likelihood of an electricity shortage.

It is important for every electricity consumer and producer to be prepared for power outages of up to two hours.

It is of paramount importance for every electricity consumer and producer to be prepared for power outages of up to two hours due to electricity shortages. It is vital that the full production and cross-border transmission capacity is available reliably for the electricity market to use in order to avoid an electricity shortage.

As electricity shortage consumers – whether small or large – we can help to avoid an electricity shortage by saving energy and, especially, by using electricity outside of peak consumption hours.

There are certain to be further changes that challenge system security in the coming years. As we look ahead to the coming winter, we should also remember to consider the need to expedite the
energy revolution as far as possible.

We should continue to work in close cooperation and seek solutions in the common interest even after the winter so that the transition to a clean electricity system can take place with a high level of system security and cost efficiency.

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